Tag Archives: intrepidHR

BUSINESS, HR, WELLNESS

Dan Erickson: Company Culture DNA

Dan Erickson, “The eHarmony of Jobs is actually eHarmony!”

Dan Erickson, Vice President of Elevated Careers by eHarmony. Elevated Careers was created to match job seekers / candidates with employers based on the three vital components of compatibility: competency, core work values, and personality fit with hiring manager.

“It’s all about cutting back on that regrettable turnover, finding the quality candidates and job seekers that will fit in with your culture, based on engagement – those who will have that emotional and meaningful connection to their work and to your company – so it’s not just about happiness, necessarily, it’s engagement – it’s about finding meaning in your job and your company.” 

Check out this great interview and learn what’s on Dan’s mind:

  • Measuring Engagement at Work
  • Redefining “Work is Work”
  • The shift in how we think about work
  • The Evolution of Culture
  • 70% of US Workers are actively NOT engaged in their work
  • Wellness – Organizational and Individual
  • HR & Recruiting: Become a Profit Center instead of a Cost Center
  • Elevated Careers: Creating a Company Culture DNA

On Engagement: “Engagement at work effects everything at a company, not just the working relationships, but right down to the bottom line. Studies show that companies with engage employees outperform those without by over 202% – plus a 35% swing to the stock price of public companies – it effects the bottom line, it effects the actual productivity.”  – Dan Erickson

**For more interviews from our live #HRTechConf coverage, click here. Our goal is to bring you the brightest and most talented individuals in HR and those who develop, market & sell  technologies which benefit and support HR processes & practices.

BUSINESS, HR

Charlie Judy: Unleashing Human Potential

Charlie Judy on intrepidHR!

Charlie Judy, Founding Partner with Work XO, LLC, talks about the work he does at Work XO – a “culture shop” – at a genetic level providing data and intelligence to helping clients align culture with potential and growth.

Human doesn’t happen organically, it is a little ironic and – but it doesn’t happen when its enveloped in this institution we call work.” 

Check out this great interview and learn what’s on Charlie’s mind:

  • Being Intentional about Your Culture
  • The Right Culture
  • The reinforcement and clarification of Culture
  • The Evolution of Culture
  • The Institution of Work
  • Remaining Relevant in the World of Work
  • Tuning Out the Noise
  • Unleashing Human Potential

On Culture: “You can’t look at your employee engagement score and say that ‘we have a strong culture’ or ‘we don’t’ – that is an indicator but you need to get deeper and understand which behaviors in your culture are actually driving your success.”  – Charlie Judy

**For more interviews from our live #HRTechConf coverage, click here. Our goal is to bring you the brightest and most talented individuals in HR and those who develop, market & sell  technologies which benefit and support HR processes & practices.

BUSINESS, HR

Stacey Harris: The Impact of Data

Stacey Harris on intrepidHR!

Stacey Harris, VP of Research and Analytics at Sierra-Cedar, talks about the work she does at Sierra-Cedar, as well as the research they have been doing for the last 19 years.

“Some great thought leadership research called The Annual HR Systems Survey, with results launched every year at the HR Technology Conference & Exposition.” 

Check out this great interview and learn what’s on Stacey’s mind:

  • Nine years ago, we weren’t even talking about “the cloud”
  • Are we making employees’ lives better?
  • Payroll in the Cloud
  • Globalization of Business Today
  • “Paying it Forward” – is the HR industry more connected than others?
  • New to the Survey – Social Responsibility
  • The Benefits of Diversity
  • The true impact of real data

On Diversity: “I think organizations are paying much more attention to their brand – they are also paying attention to it (regulatory) if they are going to track this from a data perspective, so they can no longer claim ignorance.” – Stacey Harris

**For more interviews from our live #HRTechConf coverage, click here. Our goal is to bring you the brightest and most talented individuals in HR and those who develop, market & sell  technologies which benefit and support HR processes & practices.

BUSINESS, HR

Mike Rude: The Future of HR

Mike Rude: SVP & CHRO at Option Care

Mike Rude, Senior Vice Vice President and Chief Human Resource Officer at Option Care, talks about his work, the work that Option Care does, and the future of HR.

“The future of HR and the role that technology, in particular business analytics, will likely play in the human resources space over the next few years…, There’s so much data out there – what is the most relevant information and what are the relevant metrics – what are things that really have meaning to business outcomes – not just ‘things that can be measured’.  I’m not sure anyone has the silver bullet on the ideal set of business analytics.” 

Check out this great interview and learn what’s on Mike’s mind:

  • The Futue of HR and the role of Tech in that Future
  • The Value Proposition to Your Customers
  • Measuring the Right Analytics
  • Revenue per Employee?
  • How is it different in Healthcare HR?
  • The constant changes in Healthcare, and the influences those changes have
  • Progress – will we see it?

“There are still the basics you need to deliver, these is still the transactional aspect of  employing people that you still have to deal with on a day in and day out basis. You still have to pay people, you still have to get that right…  I do think millennials will push the envelope and force companies to think very differently about you attract and keep people.” – Mike Rude

**For more interviews from our live #HRTechConf coverage, click here. Our goal is to bring you the brightest and most talented individuals in HR and those who develop, market & sell  technologies which benefit and support HR processes & practices.

HR, HUMANITY

Better off Dead: My Two Dollars Story

Better Off Dead

My two dollarsOne of John Cusack’s first movies was an odd spinoff of the wildly successful John Hughes films of the 80’s and 90’s called Better off Dead. Throughout the film, there is a running theme of a newspaper boy, yes, for those younger than 40 – we did not exercise child labor laws that strictly back then, chasing after the main character, Cusack for two dollars. You see, on top of delivering the papers to your front door, you had to do collections door-to-door, weekly for the money from the person getting the newspapers. Daily papers were .25c, and the Sunday paper was .50c, equaling two dollars a week. A few weeks ago, this came to mind one evening in a convenience store near my home.

A Wild Week

After what had been a wild week with candidate negotiations, allergies, and lack of sleep based on said allergies, something good finally happened. Sometimes, you just have to look past yourself to realize there is someone out there a little worse off than you. I had to run down to the local 7/11 for milk, as the carton in my fridge had spoiled. I drove down to the corner store, cursing that my craving for mashed potatoes and the need of milk to make the deliciousness that that dish is, forced me out of my home and into my car to procure this magic liquid.

When I arrived at the market, it was unusually busy, people milling around – looking at products deciding what snacks they wanted, etc. Now you see, I am not really a big grocery store guy, I eat out a great deal, so I know convenience stores well and how they operate. You have to move fast, or a line will form and then you are caught standing there pissed off because you just want to go home and eat mashed potatoes, and yet you are standing here, waiting. First world problems, am I right?

Two Dollars

better off deadI hate being right sometimes, and like a perfect storm, a line had formed, yet, not a bad one, there was a single guy and father there with his two young daughters in front of me, so I thought, oh well just a few more minutes. It could be worse with the sea of bachelors that were in the store. The first guy went off without a hitch, paid and off he went. Then, the father walked up with a loaf of bread and cheese. He was rung up quickly, handed the clerk his card, and the transaction was done. Boom, I am on the home stretch now! The youngest child then pulled a candy out of her pocket that she had been holding. The Father looked at her and smiled and said, “Sure, baby girl.” I stood there deflated and angry. I was tired, hungry, and just wanted to get back home to make the potatoes and eat my dinner. The clerk rang up the candy, and it popped up as two dollars on the register, he handed the man the card, again. So yet another transaction I have to sit through, great how much longer do I have to wait!!
Then, it happened, the card was declined, for two dollars.

His body language showed his humiliation that he could not afford two dollars, in front of his children, when he was told there no more funds available on his card which turned out to be an EBT card. Two dollars. For those who don’t live in Virginia, the EBT card is the equivalent of a debit card for food stamps funded by the Common Wealth of Virginia, and he had run out of funds. He scooped up the little one, who was crying that she wanted her candy, and took the other child’s hand, then walked out to his car leaving the candy on the counter in front of us. He said nothing but I caught his eye as he looked down and slowly left the store. The attendant took my milk as I watched the family with the sound of the words of two dollars ringing in my head, and I said, “The candy, I want the candy, too.”

Atonement Gained

The clerk’s expression was one of puzzlement that turned to a look of atonement for not doing what I should have done. I tried swiping my card but was having problems with the machine to complete the transaction quickly enough. Turning to look outside, I saw the Father getting into the passenger seat. Feeling my frustration, the clerk only said to me, “Go, Atonement gained, I suppose.” I nodded to the attendant and ran out of the store leaving both my credit card and wallet on the counter to catch the family before they left. When I got to the car door, his window was down so I handed him the candy and just quietly said, “Sir, you forgot something.” I turned to go back inside, and the father called out to me and mouthed, “Thank you, man.” Two Dollars.

A Very Good Man?

When I went back in, there was a line of people all staring at me, a long line. They were all men of different races, Black, White, Indian, and Asian. Not one person said anything, not one person was upset, in fact, they were all staring at me, some deep in thought, others smiling and nodding. As I reached for my carton of milk, the attendant held on to it for a moment looking me in the eye, smiled, and gave me a short bow and said, “You are a very good man.”

No, I really am not. I stood there in that line cursing the fact that I, a single man, who has enough money to eat out every night if I want, was angry that I had to wait in line. I felt anger toward a Father, caring for his progeny and, more than likely having cheese sandwiches for dinner, couldn’t afford candy, for two dollars. It is moments like this that remind me that we must look around and lift each other up, love each other a little more, and recognize that even though it can be bad at times, there is more than likely someone worse off than you.

Next time, I am going to be a great deal more patient with the world, I think we all should strive for that. I wish it would only cost two dollars to change the perception in the world, which would be amazing.

#truestory #life

HR, LEADERSHIP

HR Latte: When HR Kills Innovation Efforts

Part 1: Guest Josh Berry in a new #KeyPointPodcast series
“When HR Kills Your Innovation Efforts”

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 85

Series: When HR Kills Innovation Efforts

HR is a core piece of the innovation equation and can make or break your innovation efforts. Econic helps corporations map and execute innovation. After working with many corporations in many different industries, Josh Berry, Co-Founder of Econic has discovered some barriers to successful innovation that have their roots in HR.

In Part 1 of this series, Rayanne Thorn invites Josh Berry to talk about People and whether or not everyone is cut out to be part of an innovative company. Just as the opposite can have a negative effect on any company, bringing the right people to an innovative company and then providing them with the right opportunities can promote incredible success.

Tune in as Josh discusses what he has discovered from his years of consulting and working with HR departments.

Discussion Points for this episode:

  • Recognizing the HR barriers to innovation success
  • Why disruptive companies need to be so disruptive
  • Does technology actually provide a solution?
  • Necessary shifts to HR processes in an innovative company
  • Not everyone is cut out to be an innovator
  • Getting the “People” part right
  • How to Identify Innovators

    On Twitter

    @Josh_Berry
    @Ray_anne
    @HRLatte
    and @intrepid_NOW

    *Click here for past Episodes 1-66

    HRLatte is made possible by:

    Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

    Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and continues to hone this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional radio shows, hosting & moderating webinars and podcasts, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

    For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on Twitter, LinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.

     

BUSINESS, HR

Stress Relief: The Danger of Over-Consumption

Stress Relief: The Danger of Over-Consumption

“That’s the problem with drinking, I thought, as I poured myself a drink. If something bad happens you drink in an attempt to forget; if something good happens you drink in order to celebrate; and if nothing happens you drink to make something happen.” ― Charles Bukowski

#truestoryMany of us in the recruiting business find ourselves sitting at a desk all day with our only exercise being typing on a keypad or a phone pad. Our cardio is our mouths screening and closing job candidates while selling to managers and trying to smile through unrealistic requirements put upon us.

This, unlike most of the things in our irrational choice to become a recruiter, is something that we actually can control. Some do, most do not. We merely slip into a comfort zone of drinking to relieve the stress. It’s like our version of exercise, instead of running to stave off stress, we drink alcohol. I have been to, and have spoken at, many conferences and have seen firsthand how the one constant communication tool is the copious amounts of alcohol that is consumed after the conference and exposition. I am not one to cast aspersions, as I have in the past had my fair share of binges and late-night revelries, but we need to make sure that this the exception to the rule and not the common thought out there. I was once asked in an interview how I dealt with stress. My answer was that I drank heavily.

Oddly I got the job.

I have to admit I was being interviewed by fellow recruiters so looking back, it makes sense, I guess. Also, I was, and am, snarky as hell – so at the very least, I thought it was funny.

This #truestory is about the person who took a chance on me those many years ago who got me into recruiting and the downward spiral that his life became as a warning of the dangers of alcohol abuse. Now, I am not saying that every recruiter is an alcoholic per sé, but we do seem to want to grab that glass of wine or whiskey and drink our troubles away. Hell, even now I am writing this at a bar waiting for the traffic to die down on the beltway, in other words, I’ll be here a while, but I am just going to sip on that beer. I like using relatively generic names when I speak or write to protect the identity of the person, so we are going to call my first mentor, Mike.

Have You Met My Friend, Mike?

“I like to see the glass as half full, hopefully of Jack Daniels.” 
― Darynda Jones

Mike was a great guy, who became a friend. He showed me the ropes of how to find, select, and close candidates. He was a master at it. He was a few years older than I, but he had grown up in the business since getting out of college with a literature degree. Since he could not find any other role for himself, he fell into recruiting, much like most, if not all of us, have. He was the silver-tongued devil who you just had to admire. When he spoke, you wanted to listen because he was eloquent and chose his words with precision. It was like watching a surgeon operate; he knew just how to cut through the bullshit and get to the real story. He was a good-looking guy, which complemented his charisma, and he could put on the charm at a bar, for a while.

Mike liked to drink, and when I say drink – I mean he REALLY liked to drink. He was a bourbon man and knew a great deal about the history, distillery process, and the nuances between manufacturers. I believe if you drank the way he did, it was not out of the question that his expertise would allow him to be a bourbon sommelier. I am not sure if that even exists but hey this is my story, and he can be an expert if I want him to be.

The thing about Mike is, he wasn’t a mean drunk, or loud, or even stupid. He was, shall we say, a dejected drunk. He would stare off into the distance, sometimes while telling a story he would lose his eloquence and sometimes, he would just stop talking altogether; in the middle of a statement. Other times he would cry, not bawl or wail, but sort of as a release of emotion that had been bottled in for too long and was being let out painfully slow.

I was still in the part of my life that hitting the bars after work was what you did. Happy hour was indeed happy, and you could get over priced drinks for a much lower price and when you are only making $15 an hour, that means one or two more libations. Mike knew this, and since he almost always picked up the check, and he was making a hell of a lot more than $15 an hour, he was happy to pay for a drinking buddy that would look out for him. I was happy to oblige as the drinks were plentiful, the stories flowed with the bourbon, and since Mike did not like to drive, I always wanted to make sure he got home safely by putting him in a cab or drop him off myself.

I had seen plenty of drunks, in my past, having been a bartender in my former life; I had learned how to control the situation and talk them off the ledge. After a few months, I came to realize that Mike was, in fact, more than a drunk, he was a functioning alcoholic who was spiraling out of control.

He started keeping a bottle in his desk and since the owner went out for lunch, every day and Mike’s desk had high cube walls he was able to take a shot or two during lunch time. Then, it was three or four, then, well, you get the point. It got bad, so bad that he was slurring his words by 4 pm and was even losing cognitive functionality at times. The owner of the company was clueless as to what was happening as Mike was making him cash and that was all he cared about, mostly. Caring about an employee who was crashing and burning was something that would make him a human being, which turned out – he was not. Yep, it was an agency, so would you be surprised? Probably not, if you have ever worked for one. Money makes the world go round.

The News…

“Ignorance is a lot like alcohol: the more you have of it, the less you are able to see its effect on you.” ― Jay M. Bylsma

Mike had been out all week; I thought he was on vacation but, apparently from the messages I got, he was on a bender. I went out with him on Wednesday telling him the boss was not thrilled that he kept calling in sick, he shrugged his shoulders, slammed another glass of bourbon down his throat, and said, “So what!”
I got into work on a Friday morning after taking the night off from going out with him; I needed the break. When I got in that morning, the mood was somber in the office. The place was not exactly a bustling habitat of activity, but there was usually a buzz, people on the phone or tapping away on the computer, instead there was only the sound of silence. There was something in the way people looked at me when I came in. It was as though they wanted to tell me something but did not feel that it was their place to do so. I made it to my desk, attached the leg iron to my ankle, and began my work day. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw one of my coworkers staring at her screen with red swollen eyes, the kind brought on by tears. She was not typing or reading she was just, staring as if she was in some trance. The owner came out of his office and came to my desk. He looked me in the eye and with the emotion that would have been emitted by a stone spoke.

“Mike is dead, sorry I know you were friends, but we need to move on. Seats need to be filled.”

He then walked away, without another word, right to his office and closed his door. The bullpen all looked at me at that moment for my reaction, my response, I had none. I sat there for a minute to take it in. I stood up and walked over to his desk, his cube, empty. I opened the drawer where he kept his bottle, empty. There were no pictures or even the notebooks he kept with the notes of candidates. The desk was cleared out; there was no evidence he even existed in our office. I was lost and I was not going to be found anytime soon. What happened? Was it an accident? What kills a 43-year-old man seemingly in good health?

Alchohol.

He had drunk himself to death; his liver had given out, and he had passed out not to awaken. Taken too soon and I did absolutely nothing to deter his behavior or get him help. I just took the free drinks & wings not ever asking what was behind those eyes that would stare into space. What were the demons that haunted him? Was the pressure to succeed, the daily push, was it too much for his constitution, to the point of no return? I know the answer, and it is simple; I’ll never know because I never asked. Shame on me.

Two days later, I quit to go to another agency and start fresh. The emotion of sitting across from, and staring at, Mike’s cube was too much to bare and frankly, plus working for a man who gave me grief because I wanted to attend his funeral wasn’t worth the paycheck. The price was too high.

This is the END, My Friend

“Take a drink because you pity yourself, and then the drink pities you and has a drink, and then two good drinks get together, and that calls for drinks all around.”  ― H. Beam Piper

#truestoryIn 1995, the movie Leaving Las Vegas came out based on the book of the same name. I saw this film in 1997, the first year I started recruiting, and I think, in a way, Mike could have penned that story – as his own did, unhappily, become eerily similar to the author. Most people don’t know that the book was an autobiography and the #truestory of John O’Brian. It is one hell of a movie and an even better book. Sadly, it reminded me of Mike, a good man who didn’t know how to control his stress or his demons; he just spiraled down the rabbit hole while we all just witnessed and did nothing. There was a sadness in Mike that was daily exacerbated by the stress of the job we did and frustrations we faced, I suppose. Time to fill, the cost of hire, number of resumés sent, it is all bullshit, we are in a people business, we are not accountants.

I miss Mike. I miss my mentor. I miss my, friend.
He should be here with me smiling and laughing like he always did, lighting up a room.

I’m going to tell you what, after writing this I think I am going for a run, instead of running to the bar, the truest of #truestories.

#life