Tag Archives: home

BUSINESS, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Tommy Breedlove: You have a choice. And you should choose goodness.

Joined, on the New Business Mindset podcast, by Tommy Breedlove, the Founder and Chief Goodness Provider of Choose Goodness. You can learn more about Tommy below.

Discussion guide from today’s conversation with Tommy Breedlove:

Tommy Breedlove1. Are you missing significance?

2. Many business leaders get to a place where they might have financial success, but otherwise no meaning, no joy, and no truth in their lives.

3. “Unconscious living.”

4. How to go through a personal journey of self-discovery. What is the feeling inside?

5. Forget the idea that “it’s not personal, it’s business.” No, IT IS ALL PERSONAL!

6. “Don’t lose your humanity, for the profitability.”

7. You are allowed to have different evolutions in your life. You are allowed to make a decision to change direction and go down a different path.

8. The power of choice. You have power, because you can make choices.

9. Scarcity vs. abundance mindsets.

10. Taking a personal inventory.

This episode was originally published on Gareth Young’s podcast, A New Business Mindset!

About Tommy Breedlove:

Tommy founded the Choose Goodness movement to help individuals, leaders and organizations increase their positive impact on the world while gaining meaning and attaining financial success.

Tommy Chose to leave a lucrative international financial consulting career to create the Choose Goodness movement. At the time, he had achieved financial success and gained business notoriety and prestige. However, Tommy felt unfulfilled and had lost meaning and hope in his life. For 36 years, he felt he did not have permission to Choose, and the Choices he made were out of fear and the judgements of others instead of Goodness.

Prior to founding Choose Goodness, Tommy was on the Board of Directors, a shareholder, and the International Practice Leader for a large financial consulting and advisory firm where he advised large international and domestic companies on financial and operational strategies. Tommy and his international practice team won the 2012 Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Global Impact Award.

Tommy enjoys traveling, reading, experiencing new cultures and food, continuous learning, all things outdoors, and strives each day to put his positive mark on the world. He and his wife, Heather (aka Mrs. Goodness), live in Atlanta with two adorable four-legged children.

###

AUTHORS, BUSINESS, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Stacey Hanke: How to achieve real influence, moving people to action long after the interaction is over

Joined in studio today by Stacey Hanke, Founder/Owner of Stacey Hanke Inc., and author of Influence Redefined: Be the Leader You Were Meant to Be, Monday to Monday.

Discussion guide from our conversation with Stacey Hanke:

Stacey Hanke1. How do you define influence? What are the myths of influence?

2. Why do most people believe they are more influential than they really are?

3. What do you mean by being influential, Monday to Monday?

4. What are the top challenges people face that prevent them from being as influential as they can be?

5. What are the three drivers of influence?

6. Explain the Influence Model you teach in the book. How, and why, does it work?

You can find Stacey Hanke’s book here:

About Stacey Hanke:

Stacey Hanke is author of the book; Influence Redefined…Be the Leader You Were Meant to Be, Monday to Monday®. She is also co-author of the book; Yes You Can! Everything You Need From A To Z To Influence Others To Take Action.

Stacey is founder of Stacey Hanke Inc. She has trained and presented to thousands to rid business leaders of bad body language habits and to choose words wisely in the financial industry to the healthcare industry to government and everyone in between. Her client list is vast from Coca-Cola, FedEx, Kohl’s, United States Army, Navy and Air Force, Publicis Media, Nationwide, US Cellular, Pfizer, GE, General Mills and Abbvie. Her team works with Directors up to the C-Suite. In addition to her client list, she has been the Emcee for Tedx. She has inspired thousands as a featured guest on media outlets including; The New York Times, Forbes, SmartMoney magazine, Business Week, Lifetime Network, Chicago WGN and WLS-AM. She is a Certified Speaking Professional—a valuable accreditation earned by less than 10% of speakers worldwide.

###

CONTRIBUTORS, HUMANITY, LIFESTYLE, WINE

Hungry for This Wine: The Wine for Transitions: Donnafugata SurSur 2016

The Donnafugata SurSur is a transitional wine, and I do not mean that it’s the wine that’s in transition.

Donnafugata SurSurIt’s us who are transitioning, and this is the wine that is bridging us this week from one place to the next. Literally. We are moving houses, from one part of the city to another and, though we left most of our wine in the “old” house for now, this wine made the cut of the very few bottles that we hand-carried on our move.

Here’s why I’m that hungry for this wine.

We live in Atlanta, and it’s the month of July, and it is hot. As in, sweltering. In the midst of that heat is the physicality of moving heavy boxes and bulky furniture, and making 537 decisions about what needs to go where inside a new home that we don’t yet know.

It is all, in a word, exhausting, even for someone who enjoys the karmic shake-up and editing process of a move.

So I knew that, at the end of the day, I would want something cool and refreshing and, especially in these conditions, white and crisp.

That’s one reason that the Donnafugata SurSur made the cut.

The second reason has two parts: it’s from southwestern Sicily (Sicilian wines are all the rage right now, thanks to a major surge of interest in volcanic wines from Mount Etna), and it’s made from a native grape (Grillo) that is mostly unfamiliar to me.

Being Sicilian and unfamiliar raised the chances significantly that I would be interested in this wine even though I may have been too tired to be interested in much.

And then there were the bonus points. Its low alcohol (12.73% ABV), with just enough body without ill-timed weight or heft, and fruit and florals (which I love) on the nose. There is also a clever naming convention that, among my “tougher-minded” friends, I’d be embarrassed to admit that I find adorable. In addition to being the name of an ancient indigenous Sicilian grape, “Grillo” is also the name for the cricket, which brings good luck. “SurSur” means cricket in classical Arabic, which was once also spoken in Sicily.

That’s a lot going on for one bottle of wine that made our very short-list transitional cut.

I placed a bet that I would – still – be hungry for this wine, even in a time of transition. And that bet paid off.

This wine reminds me why I love wine. Which reminds me why I love living my life. Which reminds me of all the thousands of things I’m grateful for, including moving and fresh starts and the luxury of relishing a glass or two of thirst-quenching wine at the end of an exhausting experience.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS WINE!

###

Find Cathy Huyghe’s book here:

###

CONTRIBUTORS, HUMANITY, MARKETING

Things I learned from being nice on social media

A few months ago, I decided to ONLY be nice and positive on social media.

I made this decision for two reasons: One, I grew tired of spewing my own social media venom; and two, because I grew increasingly tired of observing others doing the same.

Online, all far too many people seem to know how to do is SCREAM all day long; bitching and venting about this and that. It never seems to end.

Personally, I no longer wanted to add to the noise.

In terms of my past online behavior, this largely manifested itself in two ways: One, I bitched, moaned, and complained when a brand or organization wronged me (at least in my opinion); and two, I injected my political opinion into the wider dialog around a specific political news event or policy discussion.

At the end of the day, this was getting me nowhere. I needed to stop. I was getting frustrated. And it was causing unnecessary stress and anxiety.

And the spiraling behavior could only be dealt with by feeding it more. And more. And more. The process would never stop.

In the end, I decided that I needed to model better behavior online, the kind of behavior I’d prefer to see online, at least from others in my various social networks. I realized that I cannot control the whole internet, but I can control what I do and whom I follow online.

So, in addition to my stopping my own venom, an important part of the work was also to distance myself from people doing specific things online, activities that would ultimately provoke me into responding, or at least commenting. This would usually be something not very nice. Or at least not optimistic or supportive.

I grew weary of people picking political fights just for the sake of picking fights (not because they had a legitimate or principled stand on any actual policy position). They just relished the fight and heated, angry debate.

I grew to dislike people who stirred up trouble and controversy, not because they believed strongly in the issue, but because they wanted to have 100 people comment on their post, and stir the pot within the comments. It was more about the action there.

I also tired of people who spent twenty-four hours a day complaining about brands. Endlessly. It really came to a head for me when United Airlines had its unfortunate experience of dragging the poor fellow off the plane. It felt to me that people relished the chance to pile on to a brand who had done wrong…not to necessarily voice deeply-held, principled opinion, but rather, they loved the schadenfreude. That made me sick. I unfollowed more people after that incident than any day since. And have been a shadow of my former self on Facebook since that incident.

And when one controversy ends, they wait and pile on the next brand that does wrong.

On the occasion that I did offer my thoughts and opinion on a matter of political opinion, people would jump at the chance to shit on my opinion. No, these people never commented or engaged with anything else I did online, but jumped at the chance to smack me upside the head when I offered something political. It was almost like they were lurking in the shadows waiting for me to say something…

Finally, and most frustratingly, I no longer wanted to observe people complaining about their lives (and doing nothing about it).

All these behaviors combined, grew very, very tiresome. And I was tired of feeding it all with my own venom and vitriol.

So now, when someone acts in this way on any of my networks, I unfriend and unfollow, or disconnect however appropriately. It’s not personal, really, but I just don’t have time for it.

So, here are the basic guidelines I’ve made for myself:

1. I will no longer complain about brands online. I will contact the brand directly if I have a complaint that warrants further action.

2. I will not discuss religion or politics. I will conduct face-to-face, offline debates with people who are interested in understanding my point of view on an issue; not with people who just want to shout louder than I can.

3. I will not engage on someone’s post to disagree and debate. If I feel strongly enough to discuss it with them, I will do so offline.

4. When there is a big controversy that has got everyone commenting and offering their opinion, I will simply unplug, get offline, and read a book.

So what will my behavior look like? Well, I’m going to post lovely photos of my hometown, the food we eat, the travel I do, our crazy dogs, share music I am listening too, and document my marathon training (which is taking more and more of my time).

And of course, I will continue share the results of the work from my media company: Our interviews, client work, our business series, and other fascinating material generated on our platform from our collaborators.

Some of you might find that boring. But I make no apologies, because that’s my life. You’ll engage with it, or you won’t. I won’t lose any sleep over it.

So, how’s it going so far?

Well, for several months, I haven’t been negative, haven’t complained publicly to and about any brands, have ignored and/or unfollowed anyone who has been politically nasty, and disconnected from most people who spent all day long complaining about people, brands, and their life.

I will admit, it wasn’t always easy. In today’s crazy political climate, it wasn’t easy to keep silent, especially in the face of some pretty repellent behavior, commentary, and media coverage.

But I did it. And now, it’s like I’ve gone through detox. I no longer miss it. It’s easier and easier to disengage and not pay attention to all the childish antics and behavior.

Here are my key lessons learned and (sometimes surprising) observations:

1. Assholes have stopped picking fights with me. This alone was worth the effort.

2. I’ve literally stopped sending dozens and dozens of tweets complaining about things. Nothing ever really comes from doing this anyway. And I don’t even really feel better after doing it either.

3. When I do make a comment on something now, I have to put a positive spin on things. This changes how I react to situations, and that’s a good thing. I am more optimistic and positive, rather than negative. Big, positive mindset shift!

4. I have become more proactive on these channels, rather than always reacting to people stirring up trouble. This affords more control to my personal messaging.

5. Similarly, this has made me a better journalist myself, as I am no longer reacting to poor journalism. And I am learning what NOT to do myself.

6. I had long felt required to follow provocative people just to be able to react to them. Now, I can simply unfollow them, get their vitriol and poison out of my life, and stop wasting my precious time.

7. I’ve learned how to discern real news, rather than trying to count on untrustworthy sources to get their opinion on the day’s events.

8. When I personally stopped pouring gas on the fire, a lot of the negative crap went away, at least in my world (which saved me a lot of anger, time, and stress).

9. Instead of taking so much of this crap personally, I can now laugh at most people online, and realize how foolish they are acting. It now amuses me, rather than infuriates me. My blood pressure has gone down significantly.

10. I’ve learned how relatively unimportant social media is. For as a result of my decision, I spend a lot less time on social media, and much to my surprise, I really don’t miss it.

11. At first, the urge to go negative was strong. But over a couple of months, that same urge has largely gone away, and now, I couldn’t be bothered. I’ve got more important things to do.

12. And WOW the time I have saved from not getting dragged into useless, pointless debates with people whom I will NEVER convince otherwise. That time can now be spent on positive activities, at least for myself.

So, those are my key findings from being nice on social media for a couple of months.

As I’ve said before, I won’t judge people for how they act online. The beauty of these digital channels is that you can utilize them however you see fit. So, far be it from me to judge people on platforms such as these.

Do as you will, and as many have continued to do, do your worst. But for me, I’m over it. I don’t have time for that anymore.

###

AUTHORS, BUSINESS, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Cheryl Einhorn: How to make complex decisions with confidence and conviction

Joined in studio today by Cheryl Stauss Einhorn, creator of the AREA Method, and author of Problem Solved: A Powerful System for Making Complex Decisions With Confidence and Conviction. Learn more about Cheryl here.

Discussion guide from our conversation with Cheryl Einhorn:

Cheryl Einhorn1. Why is it hard to make complex decisions? What’s happening culturally to make this process difficult?

2. The big idea: Making sound decisions to complex problems can be overwhelming. It’s important to know how to control for and counteract assumptions and biases, and apply more expansive and objective thinking.

3. The so what: A four-step method, called “AREA” for the perspectives it addresses, boils down the process of untangling complex problems and makes sure the research, processing, reflection.

4. How to hone in on the motivation behind the decision and identify what’s most critical in the outcome.

5. How to avoid relying on faulty intuition and snap judgments.

6. How to understand other stakeholders’ incentives and motivations.

7. When it’s important to decelerate and pause in the process to refine and re-articulate the progression of the investigation.

8. Why it’s important to try to disprove each possible decision and plan for failure.

9. How to employ a feedback loop at each stage to show whether circling back for more data or analysis is needed.

Find Cheryl Einhorn’s book below:

About Cheryl Einhorn:

Cheryl is the creator of the AREA Method, a decision making system for individuals and companies to solve complex problems. Cheryl is the founder of CSE Consulting and the author of the upcoming book Problem Solved, a Powerful System for Making Complex Decisions with Confidence & Conviction. Cheryl teaches at Columbia Business School as an adjunct professor and has won several journalism awards for her investigative stories about international political, business and economic topics.

###

BUSINESS, HR, LEADERSHIP

Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention: Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

Part 3: Guest Expert Lauren Roselle stops by HR Latte to talk about the HR and workplace issues surrounding sexual harassment and assault. This episode addresses the benefits of Verbal Assertive Skills. 

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 115


Series: Harassment and Assault Prevention 

“The Legal Definition: Unwanted sexual advances or visual, verbal, or physical conduct that is of a sexual nature.” – Lauren Roselle

Harassment and Assault Prevention

Lauren Roselle is a nationally recognized expert in harassment and assault prevention, having led more than 1,000 workshops. Through her company Esteem, she has reached over 27,000 participants with her lively and enthusiastic teaching style. Lauren’s mission is to empower those around her to walk through the world with less fear and more confidence.

Lauren and Rayanne continue their discussion about sexual harassment issues in the news today and Rayanne shares a personal story of being drugged while on a business trip and how she handled that.

Esteem

Ms. Roselle is offering a discount to listeners who would like to participate in her sexual harassment prevention training, please visit this link at Esteem Communication.

“When you are strong in your words, you are less likely to be assaulted.” – Lauren Roselle

Discussion Points for this episode, Part 3:

  • Harassment and Assault Prevention
  • Official Stat: 1 in 3 Women have experienced Sexual Harassment in the Workplace matches 1 in 3 Women will be Assaulted in their Lifetime
  • Certainty of Self
  • Bossiness
  • Verbal Assertive Skills
  • How to manage Unwanted Touching
  • Employees should Know and Understand Company Policy: review employee handbook, ask, document, understand what company response should be / will be
  • The Story at Uber
  • What should HR do
  • Executive Management’s responsibility
  • HR Engagement Tracking benefits the Organization to help prevention, set expectations, follow-up, and positive change
  • Communication is the REAL Key to Prevention
  • “When you see something, say something”

Series
Part 1, Harassment and Assault Prevention –  Basics, What HR and Individuals Can / Should Do
Part 2, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Statistics & Personal Experiences
Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

On Twitter

@Esteem4u
@Ray_anne
@HRLatte
and
@Dovetail

*Click here for past Episodes 1-66

HRLatte is made possible by:

Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and continues to hone this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional radio shows, hosting & moderating webinars and podcasts, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on TwitterLinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.

BUSINESS, HR

Part 2, Harassment and Assault Prevention: Statistics & Personal Experiences

Part 2: Guest Expert Lauren Roselle stops by HR Latte to talk about the HR and workplace issues surrounding sexual harassment and assault. 

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 114


Series:
 Harassment and Assault Prevention 

“The Legal Definition: Unwanted sexual advances or visual, verbal, or physocal conduct that is of a sexual nature.” – Lauren Roselle

Harassment and Assault Prevention

Lauren Roselle is a nationally recognized expert in harassment and assault prevention, having led more than 1,000 workshops. Through her company Esteem, she has reached over 27,000 participants with her lively and enthusiastic teaching style. Lauren’s mission is to empower those around her to walk through the world with less fear and more confidence.

Lauren and Rayanne continue their discussion about sexual harassment issues in the news today and Rayanne shares a personal story of being drugged while on a business trip and how she handled that.

Esteem

Ms. Roselle is offering a discount to listeners who would like to participate in her sexual harassment prevention training, please visit this link at Esteem Communication.

Discussion Points for this episode, Part 2:

  • Harassment and Assault Prevention
  • Official Stat: 1 in 3 Women have experienced Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
  • Informal Poll: 95 out of 100 women and 1 out of 2 men have experienced Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
  • The Elephant in the Valley
  • The Story at Uber
  • “This not acceptable behavior”
  • Any workplace that is male-dominated, sexual harassment can be an issue
  • The media’s attention on this issue has created an opportunity for victims to speak out
  • Harassers don’t just do it once, to only one person
  • Rayanne shares a personal experience where she was drugged by what should have been a trusted service provider while on a business trip
  • The victim of sexual harassment or drugging is NOT at fault

Series
Part 1, Harassment and Assault Prevention –  Basics, What HR and Individuals Can / Should Do
Part 2, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Statistics & Personal Experiences
Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention,  Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

On Twitter

@Esteem4u
@Ray_anne
@HRLatte
and
@Dovetail

*Click here for past Episodes 1-66

HRLatte is made possible by:

Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and continues to hone this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional radio shows, hosting & moderating webinars and podcasts, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on TwitterLinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.

BUSINESS, HR

Harassment and Assault Prevention with Lauren Roselle

Part 1: Guest Expert Lauren Roselle stops by HR Latte to talk about the HR and workplace issues surrounding sexual harassment and assault. 

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 113


Series:
Harassment and Assault Prevention 

“The Legal Definition: Unwanted sexual advances or visual, verbal, or physocal conduct that is of a sexual nature.” – Lauren Roselle

Harassment and Assault Prevention

Lauren Roselle is a nationally recognized expert in harassment and assault prevention, having led more than 1,000 workshops. Through her company Esteem, she has reached over 27,000 participants with her lively and enthusiastic teaching style. Lauren’s mission is to empower those around her to walk through the world with less fear and more confidence.

Lauren and Rayanne will address sexual harassment issues in the news today, what has happened at start-ups and tech companies like Uber and how to report, handle, and prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

EsteemMs. Roselle is offering a discount to listeners who would like to participate in her sexual harassment prevention training, please visit this link at Esteem Communication.

Discussion Points for this episode, Part 1:

  • What is sexual harassment in the workplace?
  • Type 1: Quid Pro Quo, requires the conduct be unwelcome
  • Type 2: Hostile Work Environment, requires the conduct to be unwelcome
  • Identifying what the “reasonable” person would consider harassment
  • Why some companies are having trouble today
  • What can HR do to help address and prevent incidences
  • Sexual Harassment is NOT a personal problem, it is a challenge to the entire organization
  • Executive Leadership needs to say “We do not allow this behavior.”
  • Sexual Harassment Prevention Training for managers is a necessity

Series
Part 1, Harassment and Assault Prevention –  Basics, What HR and Individuals Can / Should Do
Part 2, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Statistics & Personal Experiences
Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention,  Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

On Twitter

@Esteem4u
@Ray_anne
@HRLatte
and
@Dovetail

*Click here for past Episodes 1-66

HRLatte is made possible by:

Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and continues to hone this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional radio shows, hosting & moderating webinars and podcasts, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on Twitter, LinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.

AUTHORS, BUSINESS, HUMANITY, PERSONAL GROWTH

Mark Youngblood: How to master and manage your emotions, and why that matters

Joined in studio today by Mark Youngblood, the founder and CEO of Inner Mastery Inc., and author of Dear Human, Master Your Emotions.

Discussion guide for our conversation with Mark Youngblood:

Mark Youngblood1. Understanding your emotional triggers.

2. Do you have an emotional vision?

3. Negative voices and negative emotions.

4. Understanding the roles of your conscious “Pilot” and sub-conscious “Autopilot.”

5. How to manage your emotional reactions in a healthy way.

6. How creating your reality can give you the power to create the life you want.

7. Separating fact from fiction about your emotions.

You can find Mark Youngblood’s book below:

About Mark Youngblood:

Mark is a lifelong student, and is a teacher and facilitator of Inner Mastery. His life purpose is to elevate human consciousness and promote spiritual growth, individually and collectively. He founded his company, Inner Mastery, Inc., 20+ years ago to promote personal and organizational transformation. His outreach presently includes executive coaching with top management, the Inner Mastery Community, Dear Human series of books, public speaking, and special workshops.

Mark is a Master Practitioner and Trainer of Neuro-Linguistic Programming who has read, studied, and practiced extensively in the art and science of personal transformation and spiritual growth for nearly two decades. His previous books are Eating the Chocolate Elephant: Take Charge of Change, and Life at the Edge of Chaos: Creating the Quantum Organization.
Mark is a proud father and stepfather and is married to his high school sweetheart after 30 years apart. He loves to travel and is an avid fine art photographer.

###

AUTHORS, BUSINESS, INCUBATOR

Kevin Kelly: The 12 inevitable technological forces shaping YOUR future

Joined in studio today by Kevin Kelly, futurist, Senior Maverick at Wired magazine, and best-selling author of many books including the latest, The Inevitable: Understanding The 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future.

Discussion guide from my conversation with Kevin Kelly:

Kevin Kelly– Lead us off by explaining the purpose, the big idea, behind this book. Why did you have to put it out there?

– The trends you talk about in this book are not theories, these are inevitable, in fact, already in motion. How does this inevitability change how we should think upon and act upon these trends?

– Why do we need to think so deeply about the future of technology and where it is taking us?

– Why are we so bad at thinking this way? We are not all futurists, in the Kevin Kelly sense of the practice, but most of us are bad at looking ahead. Or, doing it too short-term…

– I think a lot of people will study your 12 trends and automatically begin to think about how they apply to their business efforts. But these apply to home and lifestyle too, yeah?

– You talk about how these trends will impact how we work, live, and how we behave as consumers. But you also talk about how these will impact how we learn. Go deeper there…

– Artificial intelligence (AI) has some people worried that technology will become too powerful. What do you say to people worried that machines will soon take over?

– It’s one thing to understand and acknowledge these trends. More important that people to actually do something with them, about them. How best should one begin to tackle these and take meaningful action?

About Kevin Kelly:

Kevin helped launch Wired magazine and was its executive editor for its first seven years. He has written for The New York Times, The Economist, Science, Time, and The Wall Street Journal, among many other publications. His previous books include Out of Control, New Rules for the New Economy, Cool Tools, and What Technology Wants. Currently senior maverick at Wired, Kelly lives in Pacifica, California.

You can find Kevin’s book here:

###