Category Archives: BUSINESS

BUSINESS, HR, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP

Simon Sinek: Playing the infinite game

I had the distinct pleasure to listen to Simon Sinek’s keynote yesterday at WorkHuman18 by Globoforce.

I made these quick and dirty notes and publish them here for my learning, reference, and to solidify my long-term understanding. I thought you might enjoy the chance to compare your notes to mine.

If you attended this same keynote, let me know how your thoughts might differ from mine!

INFINITE VS. FINITE

Are you playing a short-term game? Or are you willing to take short-term losses to advance the cause for success in the long-term?

Think growth mindset verses fixed mindset.

WILL AND RESOURCES

The true key to success in any endeavor is to sustain the will to drive to success (and not lose steam along the way) and to maintain enough resources to get the job done.

Most lose the enthusiasm necessary to sustain the effort, and many run out of enough customers or money to get across the line in the end.

SACRIFICE FOR THE CAUSE (TO HAVE A JUST CAUSE)

Your organization must have a just cause to fight for and drive inspiration. It must be specific. It cannot be “growth,” it cannot be “to win” or to be “the best,” and it cannot be “to defeat the competition.”

Again, it must be specific.

And when you have that just cause, your people will make sacrifices to get there, and show up inspired to work.

INCENTIVIZE BEHAVIOR VS PERFORMANCE

We incentivize performance and results. Rather, we should also incentivize behavior.

We should reward devoted effort to unsuccessfully solve a problem, failure to successfully innovate, and to make honest mistakes.

Why? We want to encourage our people to try new things…to not be afraid to try, and to not hide from the potential ridicule of failure.

DISCRETION

You must free your people to use their discretion for when to make the right decision on behalf of the customer or to solve a problem.

Don’t trust your employees to follow your rules. Trust your employees to know which rules to break (and when).

HR SHOULD THINK PEOPLE FIRST, NOT EXECUTE EXECUTIVE DICTATES

HR departments spend more time executing the will of management (right or wrong), and not enough time exhibiting leadership to free and empower the people to do the important work to fight (and sacrifice for) the cause.

COMPETITION REVEALS OUR FLAWS

If you are solely focused on beating your competition, you will ultimately lose. And certainly not be inspirational.

No, the goal is to respect your competition, and learn from the things they are better at than you.

GOAL IS NOT TO BEAT THEM, BUT TO OUTLAST THEM

A nod back to having both the will and resources, again, your goal is not to directly beat your competition, but to have more will, more resources, and outlast them.

FIXED JUST CAUSE AND FLEXIBLE STRATEGY

Your just cause cannot change. It cannot be flexible. It is your purpose and destination.

But how you get there has to be flexible, adaptable to the roadblocks that will appear.

Too many organizations have a flexible just cause and will not budge on how they do things. This cannot work and leads to failure and frustration.

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HR, HUMANITY

NEW Podcast: Due Respect

Due Respect – a new Intrepid podcast

Episode 1 introduces “Due Respect” [42 min]

“With all due respect” typically comes before someone is about to say someone disrespectful – we are out to change this.

A Black Man and White Woman: Difficult Conversations

Chris Fields, a black man in Memphis and Rayanne Thorn, a white woman in Laguna Beach, California dive into conversations about racism, bias, discrimination, inclusion, diversity and how we can overcome. Friends, who’ve never met in real life, explore taboo topics and hope to redefine not only how we think and feel, but also open each others eyes to what each of us have faced, survived, and how we hope to thrive today and the future.

In Episode One:

  • Introduction
  • Cultural Appropriation
  • What is White Privilege?
  • A look at Fatism
  • Same Racism / Same Sexism
  • The Platinum Rule

And this is just the tip of the iceberg we will expose. No more broad strokes – we are going to break it down. Join us for some Due Respect. 

You can follow Chris and Rayanne on Twitter and connect with them on LinkedIn, their names are linked above.

BUSINESS, CONTRIBUTORS, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

10 alternatives to thinking outside the box

I am sick and tired of people saying that it is time to think outside the damn box. So, instead of fussing about it, I came up with ten alternatives. Here they are:

1. Step on the box. And move to a higher level. Use the box to get to where you really want to go…

2. Paint the box. Give it a new look. Sometimes the box just needs a fresh, new feel. Nothing has really changed internally, but doesn’t a freshly-painted house look brand new?

3. Poke the box. [h/t Seth] Just read the book. Right now.

4. Crush the box. Flatten the old, tired way. Start fresh. A flat box serves a purpose too. Plus, you can probably rebuild it if you wanted – or needed to.

5. Shred the box. Sometimes you’ve just got to begin again. And complete destruction is the only course. Damn the torpedos. (But don’t worry, if all else fails, someone will construct another box.

6. Hack the box. Sometimes boxes can be used for something other than storing stuff. Repurpose. Retool. Innovate. Open your mind to new possibilities. Come on, don’t be afraid. The people you are worried about aren’t really paying attention. Do it.

7. Rewire the box. Sometimes the box works quite well, and just needs to be rewired. This brings things (ideas) up to code, gives you a fresh start, and gives you confidence to move forward.

8. Deliver the box. Sometimes, you need different opinions, a different viewpoint, and fresh look. Give the box to someone else. Maybe they will do something that matters with it.

9. Bury the box. Sometimes, you just need to let it go. Put it away. Forget about it. Bury it. Move on. Because someday, someone will unbury it, and find wonder in the box.

10. Kick the box. When I was a kid, I loved taking boxes and simply destroying them. Kicking them, crushing them, clubbing them with sticks. I guess it was therapeutic to vent some energy. Sometimes, we just need to do this to begin again, to feel better, and feel alive. So go. Kick it, now. In the end, it is still a box. But you are different.

What are your other ideas? Please share!

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BUSINESS, CONTRIBUTORS, PERSONAL GROWTH

Finding Your Entrepreneurial Geek Pack

Growing up as a pre-teen in the 70’s and as a teenager in the 80’s, I watched Star Trek reruns, watched Star Wars a hundred times, read science fiction, learned to code Basic on my Atari 1200XL and played Dungeons and Dragons.

I was a girl geek. And yet (I think) I was still popular in school. I don’t remember feeling alienated or an outsider. Maybe because I hung out with a lot of other geeks (band nerds mostly) and we declared ourselves to be cool.

It didn’t hurt that I was also an athlete and a good student so I was friends with or at least got along with the “sportos, the motorheads, geeks, sluts, bloods, waistoids, dweebies, dickheads …” etc.

Still, in my heart of hearts, I knew I was a geek and I was willing to own it.

It takes some courage as a teenage girl to be willing to be different.

Not Cool is Now Cool

It’s completely annoying that today, being a geek is totally cool. When you can buy a t-shirt with a schematic of the Enterprise on it, you know it’s mainstream.

“But isn’t that what all you nerds, dweebs, and geeks WANTED?” cry the former cheerleaders and quarterbacks, “To be mainstream, to be popular, to be like everyone else?”

Nope. We sure didn’t.

Lynn Anderson released the song “I was Country When Country Wasn’t Cool” in 1970. Oh, Lynn, do I feel you.

Now that Star Wars buffs, computer programmers, and gaming is mainstream, I have to resist the urge to shout “I was a GEEK when geeking wasn’t cool!” every time I see Chris Hardwick’s face.

Are you with me? Do you look at “kids these days” and want to tell them how you got beat up because you hung out in the computer lab at lunchtime playing “Oregon Trail” or posting on a BBS?

It was hard being a geek back in the day! And yet we did it.

Still, I wouldn’t have done it all on my own. I had friends to play D&D with, I was in the school band, and my favorite boy friend in school owned the first Apple any of us has seen and taught me DOS. So I wasn’t alone.

At the time, it really didn’t seem like what we were doing was a big deal. In retrospect, I see now how we didn’t really think of ourselves as outcasts.

We all had each other and in each other’s eyes we were all cool. And that’s what made all the difference.

Solopreneurs are the New Old Geeks

There are now more than 20 million “non-employer businesses” (that’s what the government calls solopreneurs) but even a few decades ago it was a weird and rare thing. If you were a consultant, people just considered it a euphemism for “unemployed.”

Now that I’ve recently re-entered that mileu myself, I’m realizing that it’s “back to the future.” We’re rapidly breaking into a time when it’s becoming cool to be an entrepreneur… IF you’re a millennial hacker programmer working in an old loft with exposed brickwork and exposed ducting in the ceiling (which is painted black) working off a plywood/pipe upcycled table.

If you’re a 40-something solopreneur working on something completely unsexy like accounting, insurance, HR, or non-social media marketing, you’re back to being an invisible geek of business as far as the “popular kids” are concerned.

You better find yourself a nerd-pack.

Maybe you can call it your tribe. Although that seems to be used more and more in a marketing connotation: a demographic who can relate to you and wants to consume your content. People who become what Kevin Kelly calls the “1000 True Fans.” Beth Ziesenis calls hers the “Nerd Herd” (of which I am a proud member).

I’m not talking about this. I’m saying you need to find peers who share your business obsessions. Who know who Kevin Kelly, and Seth Godin, and Michael Gerber, and Mari Smith are. People who are interested in talking about processes and systems and strategies with the same enthusiasm that football fans use when talking about rushing yards and completions.

I’ve used these groups personally for years to help me with big projects. I’ve always called them “mastermind groups.” Which in itself is apparently pretty nerdy. I thought it was a well-known term but I’ve been surprised at how few people know the term.

Although after reading an extensive and well-researched article about Napoleon Hill (the first trackable user of the term “mastermind”) establishing a solid case that he was more of a scam artist than a self-help guru, I think I might personally adopt “nerd-pack” or “geek gang.”

Whatever you want to call it, you need a small, focused group of people who make your (healthy) obsession with business, entrepreneurship, process, systems, and strategy feel NORMAL.

Do it now.

Find three or four people, set up a regular meeting time and space, and declare yourselves the center of business cool in your neighborhood.

Then you can go back to grumping about how you were a Doctor Who fan wearing a ridiculously long scarf long before bow ties became cool.

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BUSINESS, HR

HR Latte: GDPR Compliance for HR Data

GDPR and its Impact on Human Resources

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 116

General Data Protection Regulation – GOAL: One single privacy law for the EU

grant petersen on GDPR

HR Latte Expert Guest: Grant D. Petersen is a Shareholder at Ogletree Deakins based in Tampa, Florida.
Mr. Petersen Represents and Counsels Employers of:

  • U.S. and International Labor and Employment Laws
  • U.S. and Global Data Privacy and Data Protection Laws
  • Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other international anti-corruption laws.
  • Founder of Ogletree Deakins’ Data Privacy Practice Group
  • Co-Founder of Ogletree Deakins’ International Practice Group.

Additionally, Mr. Petersen advises clients regarding the impact of global data privacy laws in the workplace, the complexities of international transfers of human resources data, and practical steps for compliance with the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation. He speaks and writes

Grant D. Petersen and Rayanne discuss the impact of the looming GDPR compliance date of May 25, 2018. Tune in for specific details to benefit those in HR who must achieve HR data security compliance.

“Is GDPR compliance for HR Data difficult to achieve? The answer is Yes. Companies will need to tailor their compliance to each EU country where they have a presence.” – Grant D. Petersen

Discussion: What HR Needs to Know about GDPR

  • Most important thing to know
  • Knowing where to start
  • How will GDPR impact HR?
  • Who does it impact?
  • Why does is matter
  • Accountability and Security
  • How to get more help or information

Ogletree Deakins GDPR

On Twitter

@Ogletree
@Ray_anne
@HRLatte
and
@Dovetail

*Click here for past Episodes 1-66

HRLatte is made possible by:

Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and hones this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional podcasts, hosting & moderating webinars, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

*For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on TwitterLinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.

HR, LIFESTYLE, SIMPLE LIVING

This One’s About the Journey

On the Road Again

It seems as though I have flown almost every September 11th in the last ten years. This year, I was not flying, but rather driving; I am currently on a 3,660-mile road trip, and today finds me in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, not quite at the halfway point. Roadtripping has become a kind of therapy for me. In my past, most road trips have been just “a way to get there” on the cheap. They have been about the destination, not the journey. That changed significantly for me a couple years ago, when I found myself alone, really alone, not knowing too much about my own likes and dislikes. Strange place to be as a 50+ year old. Nevertheless, I have tackled that truth and in the takedown, I found parts of me I never knew existed or had forgotten about.

I am a strong woman with many weaknesses.

Not sure how that came to be, but it is certainly true and…, not one to shy away from the truth, I find myself digging in and trying to expose how I got to where I am. It is difficult to pinpoint the exact time and place, can one ever? For I feel we are consistently moving to a place where exposition is how we survive with our integrity in tact.

Exhausted by Life

It is easy to get tired – it would be easy to just go with the flow and not make waves. As many can attest, that would be strongly against my nature. So, I expose myself to situations where I will learn, where I can grow, where change is not only imminent but necessary.

The first three days of my adventure found me in St. George, Utah with about 20 women from my family – our annual Thorn Women’s Retreat (Estro-Fest) was another smashing success. Next year will mark 25 years of this particular gathering. I have not been able to attend every year, but when I have gone, I have been strengthened and empowered by the women I am lucky enough to call family.

The Other Destination

While there is a business destination involved in my travels, I have wrapped a dropped pin with self-discovery. 3600+ miles does not scare me, nor will it scar me. It will fulfill something in me that is needed. Time in my head – to clear the cobwebs woven by hurt and anger – as well as releasing the stress that work can sometimes bring – and I am one of those crazies that works on vacation. Certain emotions tend to be felt more deeply or have a stronger impact, I believe anger and hurt call into that category.

journey

The Destination

My company, Dovetail Software is attending/exhibiting an annual event for Healthcare Human Resources in Seattle this weekend – The ASHHRA Conference. I love this event – it’s one of my favorites and I have attended a number of times. I will walk the aisles, speak with other vendors that support Healthcare HR and learn as much as I can from the practitioners there for erudition. There will be plenty for my team to take in, as we want to benefit clients, as well as make sure we are presenting the full benefits of what Dovetail offers.

Many years ago, I worked for a healthcare-specific search firm as an executive recruiter – this is where I cut my teeth in recruiting, in human resources.  It is strange but going to this conference always feels like going home. And, with the many changes in recruiting and HR over the last fifteen years, it is always a strange homecoming – like when your parents get new furniture, though you’ve been gone from home for 20+ years.

Change is Good

Like so many others, I have felt the pain of change in life and career. Life goes on and thank God for that.  We are often faced with what ifs and could’ve beens – it is when we see clearly, when we know the choices that were initially painful to make, when we see them through the lenses of today, that we know the choices we made were the right ones.

And while not necessarily pain-free, they are right, correct, the best, the way it should be.  I am happy where I am now. Work is fulfilling and life / love continue to be a gamble. And who doesn’t love a spin at the roulette table?

And so it goes.  Change is inevitable and usually for the better.

“Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” – George Bernard Shaw

BUSINESS, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Tommy Breedlove: You have a choice. And you should choose goodness.

Joined, on the New Business Mindset podcast, by Tommy Breedlove, the Founder and Chief Goodness Provider of Choose Goodness. You can learn more about Tommy below.

Discussion guide from today’s conversation with Tommy Breedlove:

Tommy Breedlove1. Are you missing significance?

2. Many business leaders get to a place where they might have financial success, but otherwise no meaning, no joy, and no truth in their lives.

3. “Unconscious living.”

4. How to go through a personal journey of self-discovery. What is the feeling inside?

5. Forget the idea that “it’s not personal, it’s business.” No, IT IS ALL PERSONAL!

6. “Don’t lose your humanity, for the profitability.”

7. You are allowed to have different evolutions in your life. You are allowed to make a decision to change direction and go down a different path.

8. The power of choice. You have power, because you can make choices.

9. Scarcity vs. abundance mindsets.

10. Taking a personal inventory.

This episode was originally published on Gareth Young’s podcast, A New Business Mindset!

About Tommy Breedlove:

Tommy founded the Choose Goodness movement to help individuals, leaders and organizations increase their positive impact on the world while gaining meaning and attaining financial success.

Tommy Chose to leave a lucrative international financial consulting career to create the Choose Goodness movement. At the time, he had achieved financial success and gained business notoriety and prestige. However, Tommy felt unfulfilled and had lost meaning and hope in his life. For 36 years, he felt he did not have permission to Choose, and the Choices he made were out of fear and the judgements of others instead of Goodness.

Prior to founding Choose Goodness, Tommy was on the Board of Directors, a shareholder, and the International Practice Leader for a large financial consulting and advisory firm where he advised large international and domestic companies on financial and operational strategies. Tommy and his international practice team won the 2012 Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce Global Impact Award.

Tommy enjoys traveling, reading, experiencing new cultures and food, continuous learning, all things outdoors, and strives each day to put his positive mark on the world. He and his wife, Heather (aka Mrs. Goodness), live in Atlanta with two adorable four-legged children.

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, HUMANITY, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Stacey Hanke: How to achieve real influence, moving people to action long after the interaction is over

Joined in studio today by Stacey Hanke, Founder/Owner of Stacey Hanke Inc., and author of Influence Redefined: Be the Leader You Were Meant to Be, Monday to Monday.

Discussion guide from our conversation with Stacey Hanke:

Stacey Hanke1. How do you define influence? What are the myths of influence?

2. Why do most people believe they are more influential than they really are?

3. What do you mean by being influential, Monday to Monday?

4. What are the top challenges people face that prevent them from being as influential as they can be?

5. What are the three drivers of influence?

6. Explain the Influence Model you teach in the book. How, and why, does it work?

You can find Stacey Hanke’s book here:

About Stacey Hanke:

Stacey Hanke is author of the book; Influence Redefined…Be the Leader You Were Meant to Be, Monday to Monday®. She is also co-author of the book; Yes You Can! Everything You Need From A To Z To Influence Others To Take Action.

Stacey is founder of Stacey Hanke Inc. She has trained and presented to thousands to rid business leaders of bad body language habits and to choose words wisely in the financial industry to the healthcare industry to government and everyone in between. Her client list is vast from Coca-Cola, FedEx, Kohl’s, United States Army, Navy and Air Force, Publicis Media, Nationwide, US Cellular, Pfizer, GE, General Mills and Abbvie. Her team works with Directors up to the C-Suite. In addition to her client list, she has been the Emcee for Tedx. She has inspired thousands as a featured guest on media outlets including; The New York Times, Forbes, SmartMoney magazine, Business Week, Lifetime Network, Chicago WGN and WLS-AM. She is a Certified Speaking Professional—a valuable accreditation earned by less than 10% of speakers worldwide.

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Cheryl Einhorn: How to make complex decisions with confidence and conviction

Joined in studio today by Cheryl Stauss Einhorn, creator of the AREA Method, and author of Problem Solved: A Powerful System for Making Complex Decisions With Confidence and Conviction. Learn more about Cheryl here.

Discussion guide from our conversation with Cheryl Einhorn:

Cheryl Einhorn1. Why is it hard to make complex decisions? What’s happening culturally to make this process difficult?

2. The big idea: Making sound decisions to complex problems can be overwhelming. It’s important to know how to control for and counteract assumptions and biases, and apply more expansive and objective thinking.

3. The so what: A four-step method, called “AREA” for the perspectives it addresses, boils down the process of untangling complex problems and makes sure the research, processing, reflection.

4. How to hone in on the motivation behind the decision and identify what’s most critical in the outcome.

5. How to avoid relying on faulty intuition and snap judgments.

6. How to understand other stakeholders’ incentives and motivations.

7. When it’s important to decelerate and pause in the process to refine and re-articulate the progression of the investigation.

8. Why it’s important to try to disprove each possible decision and plan for failure.

9. How to employ a feedback loop at each stage to show whether circling back for more data or analysis is needed.

Find Cheryl Einhorn’s book below:

About Cheryl Einhorn:

Cheryl is the creator of the AREA Method, a decision making system for individuals and companies to solve complex problems. Cheryl is the founder of CSE Consulting and the author of the upcoming book Problem Solved, a Powerful System for Making Complex Decisions with Confidence & Conviction. Cheryl teaches at Columbia Business School as an adjunct professor and has won several journalism awards for her investigative stories about international political, business and economic topics.

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BUSINESS, HR, LEADERSHIP

Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention: Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

Part 3: Guest Expert Lauren Roselle stops by HR Latte to talk about the HR and workplace issues surrounding sexual harassment and assault. This episode addresses the benefits of Verbal Assertive Skills. 

iHR logo

HR Latte, episode 115


Series: Harassment and Assault Prevention 

“The Legal Definition: Unwanted sexual advances or visual, verbal, or physical conduct that is of a sexual nature.” – Lauren Roselle

Harassment and Assault Prevention

Lauren Roselle is a nationally recognized expert in harassment and assault prevention, having led more than 1,000 workshops. Through her company Esteem, she has reached over 27,000 participants with her lively and enthusiastic teaching style. Lauren’s mission is to empower those around her to walk through the world with less fear and more confidence.

Lauren and Rayanne continue their discussion about sexual harassment issues in the news today and Rayanne shares a personal story of being drugged while on a business trip and how she handled that.

Esteem

Ms. Roselle is offering a discount to listeners who would like to participate in her sexual harassment prevention training, please visit this link at Esteem Communication.

“When you are strong in your words, you are less likely to be assaulted.” – Lauren Roselle

Discussion Points for this episode, Part 3:

  • Harassment and Assault Prevention
  • Official Stat: 1 in 3 Women have experienced Sexual Harassment in the Workplace matches 1 in 3 Women will be Assaulted in their Lifetime
  • Certainty of Self
  • Bossiness
  • Verbal Assertive Skills
  • How to manage Unwanted Touching
  • Employees should Know and Understand Company Policy: review employee handbook, ask, document, understand what company response should be / will be
  • The Story at Uber
  • What should HR do
  • Executive Management’s responsibility
  • HR Engagement Tracking benefits the Organization to help prevention, set expectations, follow-up, and positive change
  • Communication is the REAL Key to Prevention
  • “When you see something, say something”

Series
Part 1, Harassment and Assault Prevention –  Basics, What HR and Individuals Can / Should Do
Part 2, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Statistics & Personal Experiences
Part 3, Harassment and Assault Prevention – Verbal Assertive Skills & Holding Management Accountable

On Twitter

@Esteem4u
@Ray_anne
@HRLatte
and
@Dovetail

*Click here for past Episodes 1-66

HRLatte is made possible by:

Dovetail Software logoDovetail Software delivers web-based solutions & help desk programs that enable organizations to reduce administrative & support costs, diagnose & resolve complex business problems, and increase efficiency, while improving support.

Rayanne loves hosting talk radio and continues to hone this craft in every way possible by creating and hosting several educational and promotional radio shows, hosting & moderating webinars and podcasts, as well as a featured host on intrepid.media.

For more information about how you can use online radio or podcasting to educate your target audience or customer, compliment your marketing efforts, and grow your brand recognition, feel free to message Rayanne on TwitterLinkedIn, or via email at rayanne@intrepid.media.