Todd Schnick

Founder and Editor-In-Chief of intrepid.MEDIA, Todd Schnick is a media + business strategist and talk show host + producer. He is a former marketing strategist, national political operative, and lobbyist. Todd has published five books, writes a business + lifestyle column, is a distance runner, and lives in Chicago with his wife Stephanie + family.

AUTHORS, BUSINESS, MARKETING, SALES

Paul Downs: Surviving your own small business

Joined in studio by Paul Downs, small business owner, New York Times columnist, and author of Boss Life: Surviving My Own Small Business. Learn more about Paul and the book here!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Paul Downs:

Paul Downs1. Paul describes his business as one that has neither failed nor thrived, which is the reality for more than 25 million small businesses in America.

2. Describes three ways to fail.

3. FINDING NEW BUSINESS: A big challenge to most small business owners; how to see when also running the business; how to balance between selling and doing the actual work that you sell.

4. EMPLOYEE MANAGEMENT: Hiring, firing, and supervising; how decisions you make impact your team, not just you.

5. ACCOUNTING: The importance of sharing the numbers with the entire team, and the impact that can have on how people function in the organization.

6. WORK-LIFE BALANCE: Is this for real? Why you need to focus on things OTHER than your business, and what your true goal should be.

7. Running a small business is hard. And you are not alone.

8. You don’t have to run a billion-dollar business to be considered a success.

You can find Paul Downs’ book here:

About Paul Downs:

Since 1986, Paul Downs has been the owner of a small custom furniture business, now specializing in premium conference tables. His company has neither failed nor thrived, a narrative that is the reality for more than twenty-five million small business owners in America. Many business books tell aspirational stories of a few successful, famous, and wealthy people, glossing over their career arcs without exposing the realities of being a boss. In BOSS LIFE: Surviving My Own Small Business, now out in paperback, Downs explores the real issues facing small business owners today, like online advertising and a global customer base.
 
For years, Downs contributed to the New York Times “You’re the Boss” column, sharing his experiences as a small business owner and manager in posts that focused on topics like navigating the healthcare exchange or firing a veteran employee. Loyal readers of his column were vocal and supportive and the comments sections became their own forums on small business issues, guided by Downs’s knowledge and candor.

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, MARKETING, SALES

Karen Leland: Build your brand by design rather than by default

Joined in studio by Karen Leland, the CEO of Sterling Marketing Group, and the author of The Brand Mapping Strategy: Design, Build, and Accelerate Your Brand.

Karen Leland1. Why is a personal brand so critical today,

2. How does a CEO’s brand differ from the business brand?

3. Does everyone need a brand?

4. What are the biggest mistakes people make in building their personal brand?

5. What are the most important things to do in building a personal brand?

6. The seven brand enhancers, brand mapping process.

7. Strategy vs. tactics, when it comes to building your brand.

8. Becoming a thought leader, leveraging content.

9. How to ACCELERATE your brand!

Find Karen Leland’s book here:

About Karen Leland:

Karen is CEO of Sterling Marketing Group, a branding and marketing strategy & implementation firm helping CEO’s, businesses and teams develop stronger personal and business brands. Clients include AT&T, American Express, Marriott Hotels, Apple Computer, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

She is the best-selling author of 9 books and writes regularly for Entrepreneur.com and Forbes.com. Her most recent book is The Brand Mapping Strategy: Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand.

She has spoken for Harvard, Stanford, YPO, the AMA and been interviewed on The Today Show, CNN, CNBC and Oprah.

Karen Leland

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CONTRIBUTORS, LIFESTYLE

The Intrepid Guide to Flying On Commercial Airlines

While I am not a billion mile flyer, I do travel more than the average person, and over the years, I’ve accumulated a few basic rules of common sense and basic courtesy that all should follow.

Frankly, I shake my head at what some people do on airplanes. And don’t excuse it because they do not fly very often – a lot of these guidelines are just common sense.

And if you follow these, you’ll enjoy your flight more, the passengers around you will too, and won’t want to smack you with a brick!

Flying On Commercial Airlines: The Guidelines:

Flying Commercial AIrlines1. Don’t recline your seat. The person behind you is in a sardine can already. Why be thoughtless and selfish?

2. You are sitting behind me, yes. But that doesn’t mean you are allowed to use my seat back as a means of pulling your fat ass up from the seated position. You do realize you are sling-shotting me into my coffee, right. And every now and then, pulling my hair.

3. Why do you have to eat food in the plane before we take off? Can’t you eat in the terminal before boarding? Especially stinky food. Really?

4. Middle seat patrons gets both armrests. Period. End of sentence.

5. Go ahead and sleep. But if you know that you snore, be mindful. If you do, I will Instagram your face when you drool all over yourself.

6. Who in the hell farted? Jesus-age-of-Christ-on-a-popsicle-stick. Really?

7. It’s bad enough that TSA makes us take our shoes off at inspection. But don’t do it on the plane. Your feet smell.

8. Enjoy your music. Just don’t make ME “enjoy” your music. #VolumeControl

9. When the flight attendant walks up and down the aisle to gather refuse, this is not license to empty all the crap out of your backpack.

10. If I’m wearing headsets or reading, it means that I don’t want to talk to you.

11. Kids are going to cry and fuss on a plane. That can’t be helped. But the parents better make an effort to try.

12. Don’t kick the seat in front of you. You’d bitch if someone did it to you.

13. Don’t invade my personal space. Your elbow, shoulder, or belly is NOT allowed in my space.

14. If you’re boarding and wearing a backpack and you turn and smack my head with it, I may stand up and smack you right back.

15. When you are the last zone to board, don’t be surprised and don’t complain if you have to check your bag. #Reality

16. When the TSA agent says “Keep nothing in your pockets,” it means the following: KEEP NOTHING IN YOUR DAMN POCKETS.” No keys, no ID, no wallet, no coins and change, no pens, no candy bars…NOTHING. It’s actually quite simple…

17. Why do you wait until the last possible minute to get yourself ready for the TSA X-ray and bag scan process? As in, don’t wait until you get scolded by the agents to remove the STUFF FROM YOUR DAMN POCKETS.

18. When you put your carryon in the overhead rack, can’t you take an extra second to position it so that others can utilize the space too? That overhead bin isn’t your personal, private storage rack.

19. When deplaning, don’t stop immediately after exiting the jetway – and in the middle of the exit area – to check your connecting flight info. There are 200 people stacked up behind you. Get your head out of your fanny, and get off to the side.

20. If it is an evening (or early morning) flight, and you AREN’T reading or doing anything that requires it, please turn off your overhead light. That damn thing is bright.

21. A little hack I’ve devised over the years: If I am assigned to Row 20, I don’t wait until I get to Row 20 to see if there is space in the overhead bin. If I notice available space on my way back, say at Row 10, I’ll go ahead and put my carryon right there, and just pick it up as I deplane. Simple.

22. If you have an assigned seat, sit in the damn thing. Almost every flight I take, someone sits in a different seat. And every time, this causes stress and a commotion.

23. And if you are assigned a window or middle seat and take my aisle seat, don’t ask me if I want to switch. I specifically requested that aisle seat.

24. When getting your luggage from baggage claim, don’t jump all over me and step on my foot to grab your bag. I promise, it will come around again.

25. For gate attendants: We know that you cannot control weather delays, crew issues, or mechanical problems with the plane. But, for God-sakes, I beg you, please get on the PA system and keep us informed. That’s all we want. Well, and a cocktail.

26. When you arrive at your seat during boarding, don’t stand in the aisle for ten minutes extracting all the crap you’ll need for the flight. Get out of the way, there is a long line of people trying to get to THEIR seat too.

27. You don’t get to cut in line just because you are running late. We’re all dealing with tight flight schedules. Manage your time better.

28. Build in some time at the airport pre-flight. Why wait until that last minute? If you have time to kill, so what? No stress, and you’ve got time to grab some coffee or cocktails, and read a book.

29. When we are waiting to deplane and we are ALL standing in the aisle waiting to get off the plane, be sure to scan the area before you blindly open the overhead bin door and smack some poor bastard in the head as it pops open.

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This is BY NO MEANS a complete list. And I will continue to add and revise as time passes, and as new experiences inform new rules and guidelines!

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, MARKETING, SALES

Hal Barr: The Art and Science of Sales

Joined in studio by Hal Barr, speaker, consultant, coach, and author of the new book, The First Billions’ The Toughest. Learn more about Hal here!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Hal Barr:

Hal Barr1. The importance of moving through the sales process systematically.

2. Learning to relate to people better.

3. The art of sales.

4. The science of sales.

5. Applying the 80/20 (Pareto) Principle to your sales and business processes (and frankly, everything else in your life)…

6. Hal explains how all his art and science lessons can be applies across the board from sales, to marketing, to life…

7. Relating to people requires learning to truly listen to people. And in so doing you will learn to define people as thinkers, tellers, talkers, and taskers. Once you know this, you can relate and collaborate with these folks in a truly meaningful way.

Find Hal Barr’s book here:

From Amazon:Sales is possibly the hardest profession in the world because professionals are tainted by those that don’t do it right. This book is your guide to how to improve your skills to be the professional that others will admire and emulate. The methods discussed in this book have been tested and worked for literally thousands of sales people throughout the US and beyond.

-Learn to Speak the way people are willing to listen
-Understand who your clients are that truly deserve your time and attention
-Streamline your business and become more successful with less stress

Hal Barr has over 30 years in sales during which he developed and authored a proven sales process that increases sales, revenues and client retention. The process is based on the Pareto Principle which is almost considered a law of nature.

A little about Hal Barr:

Nationally recognized thought leader on business development. Hal presented the 80/20 Principles over 180 times a year for the past 5 years to Fortune 100 companies. Hal’s sales strategies have helped thousands of independent business people in the US grow top line revenue from 25% to 125%.

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, LEADERSHIP

Jackie Dryden: Get your head out of your bottom line!

Joined in studio today by Jackie Dryden, the Chief Purpose Architect with Savage Brands, and the author of a new book called Get Your Head Out of Your Bottom Line: And Build Your Brand on Purpose!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Jackie Dryden:

1. To build a brand and a culture base on a true purpose, verses simply focusing on profits, this process normally takes three to five years.

2. Why is now the time to have a new type of conversation with business leaders about building brands on purpose?

3. Truth: Companies who lead with purpose are actually more profitable than those who focus solely on profits.

4. What can a company stand to gain from building a culture of purpose?

5. Most companies have a mission, a vision, and values. Why are these not enough? And what’s the difference?

6. How millennials and boomers are driving real change in corporate America.

7. Jackie’s three-step process: FOCUS, FILTER, FUSE!

Find Jackie Dryden’s book here:

About Jackie Dryden:

Jackie DrydenJackie is no stranger to blazing trails. She broke ground when she led one of the few woman-owned advertising firms in the male-dominated industry. She did it again when she published her unique parenting book, Just Me: What Your Child Wants You to Know About Parenting, and traveled the nation to speak about it on television and radio shows, to newspapers and magazines, and before professional and educational organizations.

Now, she’s blazing a new trail: leading a purpose revolution in corporate America. Her new business book, Get Your Head Out of Your Bottom Line, guides visionary leaders to reconnect with their true strengths through the power of purpose. The book will be released in early 2016, and already, she is shaking up C-suites as she asks today’s leaders to uncover and communicate the true reasons their companies exists—not just to make money.

With a passion for helping others discover “why” and “what for,” Jackie leads individuals and companies to understand how to better share what sets them apart.

Jackie speaks to companies, schools and organizations across the country about business strategy, personal purpose and women’s issues. She shares her wit and wisdom with groups as small as 30 to auditoriums of several thousand.

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AUTHORS, HUMANITY, LIFESTYLE, PERSONAL GROWTH

Ryan Holiday: Ego is the Enemy

Joined in studio by best-selling author Ryan Holiday, who joined me to discuss his latest book, Ego Is The Enemy.

Notes and discussion guide from my conversation with Ryan Holiday:

Ryan HolidayWe love to blame others for our problems. Is this the wrong attitude?

Definition: An unhealthy belief in our own importance. Arrogance. Self-centered ambition.

We discuss Ryan’s own personal battles and how they impacted the writing of this book.

I don’t think most of us have a good sense of self. This is that part of the problem.

Our ego damns us at almost every turn (early career moves, success, failure).

We create our own obstacles most of the time.

What do we do wrong to enable this to happen.

The key is conquering your ego. But how…

A learned skill? Are some people just not able to pull this off?

Most people won’t be willing to take responsibility for there life and actions.

The new book pairs with “The Obstacle is The Way.”

Ambition, achievement, and adversity all play a role.

This is still influenced by stoicism.

The goal is “to think less of yourself?”

We are fooling ourselves if we think we aren’t an egomaniac.

Believing in your greatness kills creativity.

Ryan Holiday

Want an explanation for the photo above? See below:
Screen Shot 2016-06-30 at 4.46.50 PM

About Ryan Holiday:

Ryan is a strategist and writer. He dropped out of college at nineteen to apprentice under Robert Greene, author of The 48 Laws of Power, and later served as the director of marketing for American Apparel. His company, Brass Check, has advised clients like Google, TASER, and Complex, as well as many prominent bestselling authors.

Holiday has written four previous books, most recently The Obstacle Is the Way, which has been translated into seventeen languages and has a cult following among NFL coaches, world-class athletes, TV personalities, political leaders, and others around the world. He lives on a small ranch outside Austin, Texas.

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BUSINESS, SALES

Ali Mirza: The importance of sales training to getting results

Joined in studio today by Ali Mirza, the President of Rose Garden Consulting. We focus on his different approach to sales and sales training, and how they relate to getting results!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Ali Mirza:

Ali Mirza1. “Sales training never ends. Understanding this leads to sales success.”

2. Why is sales training important, and why companies need to invest more into their sales department.

3. What is sales process development?

4. What are the expectations of your sales people, and how do you motivate them properly?

5. Sales Coach vs. Sales Manager.

6. Consultative sales vs. Account reps vs. Business development rep vs. Sales closers!

About Ali Mirza:

Ali is an accomplished Sales Master and Trainer! Starting his career in sales at the tender age of 18, Ali quickly realized that he would have to become better because being terrible at selling was not fun. Ali’s first sales role was in Insurance Sales, spending 3 years going door to door, outselling everyone in the country, Ali grew bored and tired and needed a change. Rose Garden Consulting was born and since then, Ali has personally closed over $100 Million in sales for many companies from small local establishments to large multi-national organizations.

Since 2012, Ali has taken his passion for closing deals to teaching others how to close deals. Ali firmly believes, there is no such thing as a born salesman; the only things born are baby boys and baby girls! Salespeople are taught. Ali currently lives in Atlanta and travels the country helping companies increase their sales.

Ali Mirza

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, LEADERSHIP, PERSONAL GROWTH

Becki Saltzman: Are you living curiously?

Joined in studio today by Becki Saltzman, Curiosity Consultant with Living Curiously, and the author of LIVING CURIOUSLY: How To Use Curiosity To Be Remarkable And Do Good Stuff!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Becki Saltzman:

Becki Saltzman1. Are most people dissatisfied with their lives and careers because they are NOT curious?

2. “Curiosity is the cure for a lot of things…”

3. The reason most people struggle with sales is because they are not curious.

4. Becki provides the definition of LIVING CURIOUSLY (familiarity + uncertainty).

5. “Don’t be so familiar with something that you are no longer curious…”

6. Can you be too curious? Can you hide behind it?

7. How does living curiously make one remarkable?

8. Becki walks us through the five-step LIVING CURIOUSLY method:
a. Start with what you are not.
b. Dumpster-dive your life.
c. Cross-pollinate.
d. Find uncommon commonalities.
e. BLAST (blunder, learn, accumulate, successes, try again).

9. It’s one thing to be curious, but if you learn nothing as a result of being curious, it is useless.

10. You can affect change in a BIG way, but you can also achieve this through small ripple effects too…

11. Can you learn to be curious? And if so, how do you start?

12. Free-range curiosity verses applied curiosity.

13. You need to arm yourself with three curiosity questions.

14. Why does corporate management seem to be opposed to employing curious people? Or another question: how do you build a “curious” business culture?

15. Determining the “minimum viable question.” For example, “What did your childhood smell like?

16. “In the arena…” Are you even in the game, are you even in the arena if you are NOT curious?

17. The opposite of fear is curiosity, not courage.

Becki IM meme 1000

About Becki Saltzman:

Becki is the author of Living Curiously: How to Use Curiosity to Be Remarkable and Do Good Stuff. She is a curiosity consultant, assumption buster, and idea generator.

Becki holds a masters degree in behavioral science from Washington University in St. Louis, and has spent the last two decades studying curiosity and the role it plays in adventure and insights, problem solving and idea generation, sales, and ideal lifestyle design.

She is also a blogger, columnist, professional speaker, and, in addition to Living Curiously, she’s the author of Arousing the Buy Curious. In her past lives she was a real estate broker and fashion buyer. In her future life she’s the host of the soon-to-launch podcast, What Are You Missing? A Podcast of Living Curiously.

Becki is the founder of the Living Curiously Lifestyle and creator of The Living Curiously Method—a framework and teaching program for using curiosity to accomplish remarkable things in adventure, work, and life. She is the spawn of auctioneers and breeder of boys. When she’s not traveling to speak about curiosity and living curiously, Becki lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband. She loves great travel adventures, crowded dance floors, and brown drinks.

Find Becki Saltzman’s book here:

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, LEADERSHIP

Kate Sweetman: Are you moving faster than the speed of change?

Joined in studio today by Kate Sweetman, Co-Founder + Chief Client Officer of SweetmanCragun, and author of Reinvention: Accelerating Results in the Age of Disruption…

Discussion guide from my conversation with Kate Sweetman:

Kate Sweetman1. In terms of developing leaders and driving change, is it a different process in the US verses other parts of the world? Or are the principles pretty much the same everywhere?

2. Why did the world need another book on leadership, change, and reinvention?

3. If you are not moving faster than the speed of change, you are falling behind.

4. Embrace that constant change is the new normal.

5. The reinvention agility matrix.

6. One role of a leader is to understand where on this matrix their people are, and move forward accordingly.

7. It’s one thing to say “we need to change.” It’s quite another to actually drive and make that change. That’s the true skill of a leader.

8. “The Reinvention Formula.” Disatisfaction, focus, alignment, execution.

9. It’s not about changing WHEN you have to, it’s about changing BEFORE you have to.

10. Kate defines both “the Age of Disruption” and what is meant by “Reinvention.” Note: being in the age of disruption is a good thing!

11. Change will affect your day. You just have to embrace that, and realize that your current today isn’t the best it could be.

12. “We are actually programmed to learn, grow, and change. We just typically get that beaten out of us as children.”

13. You will ultimately conclude that you will only want to work in an organization that embraces change.

14. This has everything to do with talent: recruitment, development, and retention.

15. Understanding the shift from continuous improvement, to renovation, to reinvention.

16. Why does change fail?

17. People have to clearly understand what WILL happen if change fails.

18. “Leadership development IS a change process.”

19. How do you effectively start a change effort?

About Kate Sweetman:

Kate provides a uniquely valuable international perspective on Leadership and Organizations, having an extensive history researching, facilitating, advising, and publishing on multiple aspects of client work around the globe. Her first-hand experience with world leaders, Fortune 100 organizations, and Asian multi-nationals provides a substantial foundation for insights that extend beyond borders. Kate was listed as a Thinkers50 for her body of work throughout her career. She co-authored the best selling business bookThe Leadership Code.

Find Kate’s book right here:

Kate Sweetman

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AUTHORS, BUSINESS, MARKETING, SALES

Tim Matthews: How to get from Can’t to Can If…

Joined on the show today by Tim Matthews, the Vice President of Marketing for Incapsula!

Discussion guide from my conversation with Tim Matthews:

Tim Matthews1. Sales vs. marketing.

2. And why there needs to be a healthy tension between the two!

3. Need to get from CAN’t to CAN IF…

4. What’s it like running a marketing team at a high-growth cloud software company? What are the challenges?

5. Give us a sense of what’s really going on these days in Silicon Valley?

6. You write a lot about marketers from the past, in one case from the 1800’s. Why?

7. What’s one marketing development you are really excited about?

8. What drove you to write “The Professional Marketer”? And what’s this I hear it had something to do with your wife’s being a chef?

About Tim Matthews:

Tim Matthews is VP of marketing at cloud service Incapsula and author of The Professional Marketer.

Tim was born in New York City and grew up in a nearby leafy suburb before taking the long route to Silicon Valley through Tokyo. He has worked in high tech for twenty years and managed marketing teams at six companies. When not writing or poring over marketing texts, he golfs, crosswords, and tries to keep up with his wife on a standup paddleboard. He has long wondered which is harder: crossing the chasm or a 200 yard carry over a water hazard.

You can find Tim Matthews’ book here:

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